Respecting themselves, others and the world around them.
HUGO THE HAPPY STARFISH - "THE LAST BULLY" by Suzy Liebermann, Happy Language Kids Publications, 2012
Happiness Begins With Respect
Hugo is a little starfish and so it’s not surprising that in this story he comes across several bigger fish in the ocean. Sadly, they are bigger fish with the wrong attitudes – they are bullies!
After seeing his friend getting bullied, Hugo decides enough is enough. He forms the Anti-Bully Club and teaches the bullies a valuable lesson about respect.
By working together as a group, Hugo and his friends manage to show the bullies that there is always a bigger fish in the sea and that happiness comes from respecting others not bullying them.
RESPECT, COOPERATION

Nana Upstairs and Nana Downstairs by Tomie de Paola
These are the childhood memories of Tomie de Paola as he lovingly recreates a time when he was four years old and had a 94 year old grandmother who lived upstairs and a younger grandmother living downstairs and they all shared the same house.
Appreciation, Respect

Belonging by Jeannie Baker
This book depicts an inner city suburb which is bleak in its drabness, ugly signs, graffitti and dilapidated houses and the way it changes over several generations. The street is gradually transformed as a little girl and her family begin to plant native trees and flowers. Gradually the whole community becomes involved and the ugly signs are removed, houses are painted, gardens are made and trees are planted in the street. The birds return to the area bringing life and splashes of colour. The community has gradually transformed their suburb into a pleasant, living place. (7 - 11 years)
Appreciation, Cooperation, Creativity, Respect

The Sidewalk Patrol.
Brimner, Larry Dane. New York: Children's Press, c2002. Abby and her friends take time to move some bicycles so that their blind neighbor can walk on the sidewalk.

The big, beautiful, brown box.
Brimner, Larry Dane. New York: Children's Press, c2001. The Corner Kids all have different ideas about how to use a big box, but then they find that working together is the best idea of all. This book is about communication.

Arthur's Nose.
Brown, Marc. Little, Brown and Company, 1976.
Unhappy with his nose, Arthur visits the rhinologist to get a new one.

Miss Rumphius.
Cooney, Barbara. Puffin, 1982.
From the time Alice was a small girl she knew she wanted to travel to faraway places, then when she was older live by the sea like her grandfather, but he also instructed her to do something to make the world more beautiful. Miss Rumphius heeded her grandfather’s words, became known as the ‘lupine lady’ and passed on his words of wisdom to her grandniece.

Whoever you are.
Fox, Mem, San Diego : Harcourt Brace, c1997. Despite the differences between people around the world, there are similarities that join us together, such as pain, joy, and love.

What is the sign for friend?
Greenberg, Judith E. New York: F.Watts, 1985. Text and photographs depict the life of Shane, a deaf child who goes to a regular school and enjoys normal activities with the help of sign language and a hearing aid.

I Can Show Respect
Guntley, Jenette.

The color of home.
Hoffman, Mary, 1945-. New York: P. Fogelman Books, c2002. Hassan, newly-arrived in the United States and feeling homesick, paints a picture at school that shows his old home in Somalia as well as the reason his family had to leave.

Like Jake and Me.
Jukes, Mavis. Dragonfly Books, 1984.
Alex feels that he does not have much in common with his stepfather until a fuzzy spider brings them together.

The Story of Ferdinand.
Leaf, Munro. Puffin, 1977.
From the start Ferdinand the bull was unlike the other frolicking, fighting bulls, but content to sit peacefully under a shady tree and smell the flowers. When five men arrived one day to find the fiercest bull to fight in the bull fights in Madrid, Ferdinand happened to be stung by a bee. True to form Ferdinand simply sat and smelled the ladies flowers in their hats in the bull fight ring unwilling to fight.

Looking After Me.
Lecoy, Denise. Penticton, BC : Theytus Books, c2005
Simple text and illustrations teach important lessons about laughing, crying, anger, hurt, happiness, fear, trust, and love through a story about a little quail.

Respect and Take Care of Things
Meiners, Cheri

Milne, A.A. “Politeness”, Sandburg, Carl. “We Must Be Polite” from Sing A Song of Popcorn. Scholastic Inc., 1988.
These two poems are set with unusual circumstances; yet promote good manners no matter the situation or state of mind of individuals.

Annie and the Old One.
Miles, Miska. Little, Brown & Company, 1971.
Although Annie attempts to delay the inevitable, she must come to terms with the impending death of her beloved grandmother. Through the wisdom and patient counsel of her elder Annie decides to learn how to weave with her grandmother’s weaving stick. Predominately black and white illustrations clearly portray life for this Navajo girl.

The ugly duckling.
Pinkney, Jerry. New York: Morrow Junior Books, c1999. (two copies)
An ugly duckling spends an unhappy year ostracized by the other animals before he grows into a beautiful swan.

Pink and Say.
Polacco, Patricia.Scholastic Inc., 1995.
Two young men bond despite the difference in their skin color during the Civil War when Pinkus Aylee rescues Sheldon Curtis, who had deserted his troops. Pinkus brings Sheldon to his burnt plantation home where his mother nurtures them back to health. Marauders kill Pinkus’ mother and soon they are tracked, captured and separated in one of the worst Confederate camps.

Respect
Rienhecky, Janet.

Thy Friend, Obadiah.
Turkle, Brinton. Puffin, 1969.
A seagull befriends a Quaker boy, much to his embarrassment and it is not until he has helped the bird that he can accept its friendship.

Just a Dream.
Van Allsburg, Chris. Houghton Mifflin, 1990.
After a dream about life in the future, which swept Walter around the world demonstrating the effects of pollution, he transforms into a more environmentally conscious citizen.

William's Doll.
Zolotow, Charlotte. HarperTrophy, 1972.
"An excellent book about a boy named William who wants the forbidden--a doll. The long-awaited realistic haggling of this theme makes it a landmark book.: (Starred Review)-- School Library Journal "A book that is as endearing for its tenderness as for the message it conveys: there is nothing, but nothing wrong with boys who play with dolls." --Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Self-respect.
Raatma, Lucia. Mankato, Minn. : Bridgestone Books, c2002. Self-respect -- Having self-respect --Self-respect at home -- Self-respect with your friends -Setting a good example -- Self-respect at school --Self-respect in your community -- Jackie Robinson Building self-respect. Explains the virtue of self-respect and gives tips on how to have self-respect in your home, school, and community.

Respect.
Raatma, Lucia. Mankato, Minn. : Bridgestone Books/Capstone Press, [1999], c2000. Describes respect as a virtue and suggests ways in which children can recognize and
practice being respectful.

The Land of many Colors. New York : Scholastic, c1994. A simple message for peace and respect for differences is the theme of this book written by children for children. When the purple people, the blue people and the green people begin fighting and hurting ech other, they are reminded that although they have different feelings and like different things, they can still be friends. In time, The Land of Many Colors becomes a peaceful, loving world.

Junior School
The Hundred Penny Box.
Mathis, Sharon. Scholastic Inc., 1989.
Michael has a close and special relationship with his great-great aunt Dew who is a hundred years old. Worried that his mother doesn’t understand the importance of Aunt Dew’s hundred-penny box Michael carefully protects this magical box filled with one hundred years of memories freely shared between his great-great aunt and Michael as he repeatedly counts the contents.

The Sign of the Beaver.
Speare, Elizabeth. Yearling, 1983.
“Left alone to guard the family’s wilderness home in 18th century Maine, a boy is hard-pressed to survive until local Indians teach him their skills.”






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